The Gender Connection: Girls and Games – Part 2

Kat Crawford (@DramaticKat) and Stephanie Carmichael (@DrackySnacks) share their insights into the video game industry from the female perspective.  The group offers suggestions for making games accessible to girls and encouraging girls to embrace STEM education!

Part 2 of 2

The Gender Connection: Girls and Games – Part 1

Kat Crawford (@DramaticKat) and Stephanie Carmichael (@DrackySnacks) share their insights into the video game industry from the female perspective.  The group offers suggestions for making games accessible to girls and encouraging girls to embrace STEM education!

Part 1 of 2

Video Games and Violence – Part 2

Lexi Ladd, Chris Ferguson, and Gregory Blackburn break down the implications of violence in video games. The group offers advice for talking with students about violent video games and choosing the right video games to use in the classroom.

Part 2 of 2

Video Games and Violence – Part 1

Lexi Ladd, Chris Ferguson, and Gregory Blackburn break down the implications of violence in video games. The group offers advice for talking with students about violent video games and choosing the right video games to use in the classroom.

Part 1 of 2

Interview with a Teenager

Interview with a Teenager:

Tips for Communicating with Students about Game Violence

IMG_7964By Sarah Avery, Zulama Community Advocate, Educator

Last week I sat down with my sister to talk about video games in education. During our discussion the topic of violence in videogames came up. As a teenager who is often exposed to media of all sorts, including violent media, she had some advice for parents and teachers who struggle with teenage consumption of media.

  1. Open a channel of communication with your student.  In order to do this, parents and teachers must be open to students’ opinions and respectful towards what they have to say.  By inviting them into a supportive environment, you as the parent or teacher will have more room to discuss what the student wants to share with you.  #Communicate
  2. Ask the student how they feel they are doing in the virtual world.  The easiest way to start a discussion is to ask specific questions about the games, shows, or movies they watch.  It’s not enough to ask general questions.  We all know the “how was school today” question can get limited responses, but asking about a specific teacher or favorite class can get discussions going.  Try asking about the most recent level they beat, goal they accomplished, or challenge where they are struggling. #ShowInterest
  3. Be educated about popular games.  It’s important for parents and teachers to know more about a game than just a title.  You must know the context and goal of the game. Two games that have the same goal may have drastically different game play, one game might only be jumping over mushrooms and another might have guns.  Just be educated about different games your student wants to play.  #EducateYourself
  4. Setting expectations is good. Each student needs to learn that there are things expected of them and in order to earn and deserve respect from the outside world, they need to respect themselves. To do this they need to understand that accepting responsibilities for their actions is always best.  So, teachers and parents need to make their expectations known and realistic.  Your student will mess up, but positive reinforcement is best.  #RespectYourself

These are her closing thoughts: “The use of the Internet can be a great benefit and comes with the power of knowledge, “but with great power comes great responsibility” #Spiderman #UncleBen.”