STEAM: Bringing the Arts to STEM – Part 2

We’re joined by Don Marinelli, Dianna Stavros (@imaginationHA), Bob Yost, and Anthony Pezzelle (@impulsivejedi) to discuss the connection between the Arts and STEM. Listen in to hear our guests talk about STEAM connecting different content areas, keeping the excitement flowing in your classroom, and being a more inclusive approach to education.

Part 2 of 2

 

STEAM: Bringing the Arts to STEM – Part 1

We’re joined by Don Marinelli, Dianna Stavros (@imaginationHA), Bob Yost, and Anthony Pezzelle (@impulsivejedi) to discuss the connection between the Arts and STEM. Listen in to hear our guests talk about STEAM connecting different content areas, keeping the excitement flowing in your classroom, and being a more inclusive approach to education.

Part 1 of 2

The Holographic Quality Of STEAM

dmarinelliGuest Post by Don Marinelli, Ph.D, Co-founder of Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center

Have you ever equated “STEAM” with a “hologram”? It takes a creative thinker like Dr Marinelli to paint this [3D] picture!

A hologram is a photographic recording of a light field, created with a laser rather than a lens, and is used to display a fully three-dimensional image of the holographed subject.

In a holograph, the image is captured and contained within every piece of the holographic plate. If you cut a hologram into a hundred parts, you might think that each individual part will show a separate area of the image, but that’s not the case. With holograms, each of the smaller parts still contains a reflection of the complete, whole, 3-dimensional image.

That’s precisely the case with STEAM education. Each distinctive element of STEAM contains all the other elements. Think about your favorite animated movie, say, FROZEN. That movie, a marvel of animation, a beautiful example of bringing imaginary characters to life and endowing them with human attributes, is impossible to create without science, technology, engineering, and math, all in the service of the intrinsic “art” of the movie.

The science involves anatomy, light, timing, color, physiognomy; the math is manifest in proportion, object relationships, depth perception, cause-and-effect, and other fundamental Newtonian laws. The technology exists in the form of the computers, cameras and lighting used to make and store the movie digits or cells, while the engineering is the projection, audio, 3D and 4D systems, and the actual cinema space where we watch the movie.

We cannot divorce any one of these elements from the experiential whole without detrimental effect.

And yet, we do so in education. Every day. How strange.

STEAM is all around us. A building that is functional and yet impresses us by its design is the result of STEAM. Math is the engineering foundation for the building’s tensile strength, weight bearing stresses, and ability to withstand forces of nature. The building houses myriad technologies both digital (Internet, sensors, monitors), as well as analog (plumbing, conduits, electrical). And, it all comes together as an architectural marvel, an artistic sculpture in the cityscape.

STEAM is a technical way of saying – and promoting – what used to be called “Whole Brain Thinking.” It is the natural bridging of left-brain organizational, systematic thought with right-brain non-linearity and creativity. And, what is truly remarkable is that this form of thinking is an ontological reality for all children. It is manifest in a child’s curiosity and desire to make meaning.

Society has somehow devised the means of educating it out of children.

It is time for that to stop.

 


Join us for our next live Remake Learning Hangout on March 29th at 2:30 PM EST, STEAM: Bringing the Arts to STEM. We will continue this discussion by providing strategies to bring STEAM education to a classroom near you!

 

Announcing New Short Courses!

Three new Short Courses are now ready and available for Zulama schools!

BB Sub RobotArcade Game Design

Students will use Scratch and a Hummingbird robotics kit to build their own arcade game! Learning the fundamentals of game design and coding, they will use LEDs, motors, and sensors to create a game that lights up and moves.

IMG_2968Science Game Design

Science is everywhere, from tiny bacteria to space travel! Your middle schoolers will team up with friends to build and play a game about a popular science topic of their choice!

Screen Shot 2016-01-31 at 12.18.20 PMGamestar Mechanic Game Design

Your students will learn to apply five elements of game design to build a game using Gamestar Mechanic. They will create a design document, prototype, and play their game with friends!

We Want Your Feedback!

For a limited time, we’re opening up the opportunity to be the first to use these new 15-18 hour courses in your classroom, whether your school has purchased the Short Courses or not!

In return, we’d like to hear your feedback about your experience with the new courses.

What we ask from you:

  • Complete a 5 minute click and submit survey at the conclusion of the course to let us know how your class enjoyed the course activities and project
  • Take a short followup call from Zulama to share your course experience with us
  • Your classroom meets the requirements (below) for the course you’d like to teach
  • You are willing to share samples images of your student’s work

Only with feedback from our valued teachers and administrators, can we continue to bring innovative and engaging new content for your students to enjoy! We couldn’t do what we do without you!

This offer is only available through the end of Summer 2016, so if you’d like to take advantage of this opportunity, talk to your administrators, and send us an email at sarah.avery@zulama.com for more information!

Classroom requirements for each course are listed below:

Arcade Game Design Requirements

  • Access to access Scratch 2 (free)
  • Hummingbird Duo Base Kits, can be purchased here.

Science Game Design Requirements

  • Must teach in a grade 6 through grade 9 classroom, preferably in a science classroom

Gamestar Mechanic Game Design Requirements

 

 

The Gender Connection: Girls and Games – Part 2

Kat Crawford (@DramaticKat) and Stephanie Carmichael (@DrackySnacks) share their insights into the video game industry from the female perspective.  The group offers suggestions for making games accessible to girls and encouraging girls to embrace STEM education!

Part 2 of 2