Game Design After Graduation – Part 2

Albert Shih (@albertshihgames), owner of Pillow Castle Games, and Michael Lee, game designer at Schell Games, discuss the transition from student to Game Designer! Albert and Michael provide great insight on the Game Design field including the growing career paths and advice for graduating students, looking for a jobs.

Part 2 of 2

Game Design After Graduation – Part 1

Albert Shih (@albertshihgames), owner of Pillow Castle Games, and Michael Lee, game designer at Schell Games, discuss the transition from student to Game Designer! Albert and Michael provide great insight on the Game Design field including the growing career paths and advice for graduating students, looking for a jobs.

Part 1 of 2

Engaging Students Using Game Design

Guest Post by Brian Wetzel, Zulama Certified Trainer and Star Teacher

pic04Who is not interested in games? Games build relationships, teach the concept of rules, and, in serious games, promote the idea of consequences in choices we make. Most games also provide the opportunity to spark creativity in style, gameplay, and strategy. Creating them utilizes a multitude of skills, including elements of STEAM, and other 21st century skills, such as problem-solving and collaboration.

As a game designer, one must consider all these factors when brainstorming the creation of the next big game. Whether that game is a board game, card game, or video game is irrelevant. Game designers must make their games easy to learn, hard to master, and adaptable to different styles and preferences, among other characteristics. Otherwise, a game can be doomed from the beginning.

pic07As a teacher of game design, I make every attempt to ensure my students understand these characteristics and plan for them at the beginning. Elements of STEAM present themselves instantaneously and consistently throughout the process. In the early phases of design, artistic elements are used when drawing and designing graphics that will be used in the game. Engineering skills such as 3D modeling are often considered for game pieces and/or characters. Mathematics is constantly used when deciding proper size and proportions as well as distances that are necessary to be traveled for game sprites. Finally, in most cases, technology is used for the creation of each of these pieces.

As I continue to help my students in their quests to become game designers, I hope to see consistent progression of these skills. While I do not teach traditional courses like science and math, I have already witnessed progress in the areas of curiosity and creativity. My students are growing into young adults who are more curious about their mistakes and why they are occurring. They don’t rely on me as much to explain the problem(s), but rather take it upon themselves to explore what they have done to create the problem. Most importantly, they don’t see their mistakes as failure, but rather learning experiences.

BxL9r4VIYAA9gJ6As I continue to help create the gamemakers of tomorrow, I hope to get feedback of the same fashion from their other teachers. I hope this curiosity spreads to other areas of their lives. I am sure it will. In my opinion, this growing sense of motivation and curiosity is not a switch they can turn off. It will become habit in all areas of their lives. They will continue to seek understanding rather than just ask for answers. And although they will continue to make mistakes, to them, it will only translate to more learning.

Brian Wetzel

Upon completing his undergraduate work, Brian began teaching in 2005. For the first seven years of his career, he served as a 7th grade mathematics teacher for the Licking Heights Local School District. During this time, he saw the value of technology in education and decided to pursue this interest by earning his Master’s degree in Educational Technology. Upon completing his graduate degree, Brian transitioned into teaching technology-related courses at the high school level for Centerburg Local Schools. As he continues his career, Brian plans to help students enhance their technology skills as well as help other educators learn ways to integrate technology into their curricula.

STEAM: Bringing the Arts to STEM – Part 2

We’re joined by Don Marinelli, Dianna Stavros (@imaginationHA), Bob Yost, and Anthony Pezzelle (@impulsivejedi) to discuss the connection between the Arts and STEM. Listen in to hear our guests talk about STEAM connecting different content areas, keeping the excitement flowing in your classroom, and being a more inclusive approach to education.

Part 2 of 2

 

STEAM: Bringing the Arts to STEM – Part 1

We’re joined by Don Marinelli, Dianna Stavros (@imaginationHA), Bob Yost, and Anthony Pezzelle (@impulsivejedi) to discuss the connection between the Arts and STEM. Listen in to hear our guests talk about STEAM connecting different content areas, keeping the excitement flowing in your classroom, and being a more inclusive approach to education.

Part 1 of 2