The 4 Cs: From Buzzword to Reality

By: Amy Pavelich, Zulama Copy Editor

There’s an exciting change taking place in today’s classrooms. More and more teachers are incorporating the 4 Cs (critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity) into their lesson plans and it’s making a huge difference in the way students learn and how teachers instruct.

For this post, we talked with a dynamic teacher who’s committed to the 4 Cs. She’ll share a bit about how she applies them to students and herself. And at the end, we’ve got some great resources and inspiration for using the 4 Cs in your classroom and life.

4 Cs Refresher

But first, a quick review of each of the 4 Cs:

Critical Thinking: viewing problems from different angles

Communication: sharing ideas, questions, and possible solutions

Collaboration: achieving goals by working together

Creativity: courageously trying out new ideas

How does encouraging the 4Cs impact your students? Well, the possibilities are endless. Students will learn empathy through collaboration and communication. They’ll make important connections through relationships centered on valuing different perspectives. They’ll become critical, and in many cases divergent, thinkers, by exploring different ways to come up with super creative solutions to problems. And with the world they’re inheriting, all of these life skills will come in handy as kids set out on their paths to good citizenship and continuous learning.

With the 4 Cs a student can become a:

4 Cs Graphic

Advice from a 4 Cs Teacher

So, as a teacher, how can you successfully implement the 4 Cs in your classroom? And, just as importantly, for yourself? We asked Courtney Sears, a second-grade teacher who’s a champion of maker spaces and a genuine thought leader in education. (Check out “Taking the Time for Making,” where she discusses how she designed a maker space in her classroom that incorporates STEAM challenges!) She gave us some really useful ideas that will hopefully inspire you in your own quest for cultivating the 4 Cs.

Using Projects to Cultivate the 4 Cs for Your Students

Courtney uses projects to help her students cultivate the 4 Cs. She’s found that the most engaging assignments and student work come from projects that blend all four elements together. Here are a couple of examples:

  1. “Each second grade class in our school has a classroom maker space. Each week the kids have time to work on self-directed projects. We use the time to teach communications skills and habits of mind such as optimism, flexibility, and persistence. Kids build forts, light-up tiaras, doll houses with working elevatorsyou name it! They couldn’t complete these projects without using all of the 4 Cs.”
  2. “For a unit on weather, my students worked in small groups to design a weather manual that explained how different weather instruments worked. My students had to use Google Docs to write and publish the book. They used the comments feature to give each other feedback on their work and they had to help each other solve problems.”

“Explaining to them that all of their names went on the cover and that no one would know what particular work each kid did really helped them see the importance of working together to create a product they could all be proud of.”

Cultivating the 4 Cs for Yourself

The 4 Cs are valuable for teachers, too. Courtney has found that one great way to practice using the 4Cs herself is by connecting with other educational professionals, establishing a support network where she can seek out fresh perspectives and collaborate.

“I do all of my planning with my second-grade teamwe accomplish so much more by working together. Pushing myself to try new things and seeking out opportunities to grow professionally help a lot. My teacher fellowship helped me develop relationships with policymakers, advocate for teachers and students through writing, and dig more deeply into the world of teacher-led professional development.”

The 4 Cs of Professional Learning Networks

Courtney has also developed a robust online community, aka a Professional Learning Network (PLN). She’s a big fan of PLNs as an avenue to the 4 Cs. There’s an abundance of creative ideas you can learn from others to try out with your students and opportunities to connect and collaborate with other educators who are rethinking learning space, refocusing curriculum to be project driven, and connecting more than ever with their students.  

Courtney has had a lot of success using Twitter to build her PLN:

“Twitter connects me with blog posts and online articles from orgs like Teaching Tolerance and EdWeek. I also participate in Twitter chats. I connect with teachers and authors I would never have the chance to work with in my school or district.”

Since it can be tough to get started developing your own PLN, here’s her advice to teachers who are new to it:

“To get connected on Twitter, follow the curricular leaders in your district, the authors of professional books and blogs that have most influenced you, and take part in Twitter chats. Be generous with your follows, comments, and retweets so that others can get to know you and see what you are about. Make sure that you follow a diverse group of educators. Beyond Twitter, seek out enriching professional development and networking opportunities that will push you to do better and help you make connections beyond your school and district. Finally, share your story with others. There are many education publications eager to share the voices of classroom teachers.”

Personalized Professional Development Source: EdSurge.

A Parting NoteThe 5th C?

We think it’s worth acknowledging that among the 4 Cs, a 5th C exists: connection. It is inherent in everything you do to achieve the 4 Cs, and some of the best experiences that come from them. As famed researcher, Dr. Brené Brown says, “People are hardwired for connection.” But to make that connection truly meaningful, valuable, impactful, purposefulwe must continuously engage our students in practicing the 4 Cs both in and outside our classrooms.

Courtney Sears is a second-grade public school teacher in 1:1 classroom in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She is National Board Certified and a 2015–2017 North Carolina Hope Street Group Fellow. She has been teaching and learning with young children for 18 years. She is passionate about cultivating classrooms with growth mindsets so that children can confidently take the lead in their learning.

Resources:

Check out these useful resources for more information on the 4 Cs and ways to incorporate them in your classroom!

  • Critical Thinking: Self-awareness and metacognition are discussed for helping improve learning.
  • Communication: In STEM fields, empathetic communication is a fundamental ingredient for success . . . If students learn to express ideas in a persuasive way and respond gracefully to reactions to their opinions, they’ll be able to promote innovation and social change through fields like bioengineering or video game design.”
  • Collaboration: This P21/Pearson Paper explores what good collaboration looks like and how to design collaborative activities in your classroom.
  • Creativity: “The process of having original ideas that have value” (The Element, 2009). This is a must-see Ted Talk by Sir Ken Robinson on “Changing Education Paradigms.” Even if you’ve already seen it, it’s worth watching again! And there’s a featured RSA video animation as a bonus.  
  • Common Sense.org’s video provides example ways to incorporate the 4 Cs into classrooms using technology.
  • Teaching Thought gives 10 reasons for why developing a PLN is important for teachers.

Want to spice up your curriculum this fall? Bring game design and computer science into any class, at any time with our Short Courses.

Back-to-School Wisdom from the Experts

Decorating, lesson-planning, gathering project materials . . . there are a lot of little details to keep track of when heading back to school. What’s most important? We asked teachers, administrators, and education specialists for some back-to-school advice. Here’s what we took away:

  • Start by building relationships with students, parents, and other teachers.
  • Take opportunities to learn with and from your students and your fellow educators.
  • Get inspired by celebrating your past achievements.

Focus on Relationships First . . .

. . . within Your School

Some of education’s big thinkers consistently said that getting to know your school community will make for a year of deeper learning:

“My one piece of advice for educators as they prepare for another school year is to form relationships early and often. First, know yourself. Reflect often about who you are as an educator, what you do well and how you can do it better. Take time to know who your students really are. What their personalities are. What they like, don’t like, etc. . . . Building positive school culture is up to us all. Form those relationships with colleagues. Learn from them. Grow with them. Isolation is a choice teachers make. There is so much we can learn from each other!”

Steven W. Anderson, Educational Evangelist, Speaker/Consultant

. . . with Your Students

“. . . all that we do is grounded in relationships. The best way to kick off your year is by building a culture of innovation in your classroom where trust is the foundation, students are free to take risks, and the culture is dynamic and supportive. Take the first few days to build your team. Empower the voice of everyone in the room and ensure that they leave feeling valued, respected, and that you couldn’t be more excited to have THEM on your team this year. Show your new group of kids how much you care. Make it obvious that you love your work and that there is nowhere else in the world you want to bethan learning alongside them. Build relationships, push their thinking, and the content will follow. Invest the time early and the relationships will pay academic dividends for the rest of the year!”

Thomas Murray, Director of Innovation, Future Ready Schools, Washington, D.C.

Vicki Davis of CoolCatTeacher offered an idea for a fun relationship-building activity:

“I have students use play dough to model something that is wonderful about them. Some will model a basketball and say they love basketball. Others may model a horse or a pet. Still others might model a book. It gives me insight quickly into what they love and who they are. So, while there are many things we need to be doing, remember to start off with the relationship!”

Vicki Davis, Teacher & Blogger, Founder of CoolCatTeacher

In order to have meaningful relationships with students, we have to consider the way that external factors, like the current political climate, are affecting their lives:

“. . . be candid and nonjudgmental when answering students’ questions about the dialogue going on in the United States as elected political leaders and the news media tackle important issues about immigration, global affairs, health care, the Russian ‘hacking’ scandal, and national security. Students, like the rest of us, are being barraged by the 24/7 news and social media cycles and we have to assuage students’ fears and concerns by helping them navigate the news cycle and use their critical thinking skills to understand the often hostile communication interactions going on in America and the global community.

Delbert White Jr., Education Technology Thought Leader

. . . with Parents

Form positive relationships with parents. Don’t just call home when a student is in trouble. Call home, write, as often as you can to let them know how awesome things are. It takes just a second to make a parent’s day.

Steven W. Anderson, Educational Evangelist, Speaker/Consultant

“Don’t rely on students to communicate information and what’s happening in your classroom. Find tools to “tell YOUR story” and then share them with parents, community, and the world directly.”

Andy Adams, Digital Learning Specialist, Region 7 ESC

Take Opportunities to Keep on Learning

Mark Suter, a game design and programming teacher, shared what he is getting out of professional learning:

For this fall, I’m attending some conferences to find resources for my game design and programming courses.

Mark Suter, Game Design and Programming Teacher

We also heard from a couple digital learning experts about alternative professional learning activities that they are offering at their schools:

“I’m working with my colleagues to plan a hands-on week-long conference—called JumpStart—for our faculty to kick off the school year. We are excited that it will be a mix of featured speakers, EdCamp-style discussions, and breakout sessions. With so much choice and variety, we hope that every educator will get the ideas and energy they need.”

Kerry Gallagher, Digital Learning Specialist at St. John’s Prep

Kerry doing a parent/student night to help parents learn more about how their children use iPads in school.

“This fall finds us entering the final stage of our 1:1 rollouts . . . we are noticing our teachers are seeing devices and technology platforms as true tools of learning rather than separate and additional to the curriculum . . . To help our teachers gain confidence and knowledge, we (our team of edtech coaches) are creating challenge-based explorative professional learning activities. These are meant to be hands-on, fast-paced and are built to immerse the teacher in the platform rather than training them to swipe and click.”

Brianna Henneke Hodges, Director of Digital Learning for Stephenville Independent School District

For some teachers, continued learning means thinking about how they might alter lesson plans based on student feedback:

I prepared by looking over my lessons from the previous semesters and tweaking them based on how they went. Keeping many with tweaks, while getting rid of some entirely. Experience is key.

Blake Borden, Zulama Teacher

Get Inspired by Celebrating Last Year’s Accomplishments

A few educators and learning specialists reflected on their proudest moments from last school year:

Celebrating Students

“My proudest moment last year was when my students successfully deployed their Unity apps to the HTC Vive that they designed and coded themselves.”

Mark Suter, Game Design and Programming Teacher

“In terms of using Zulama, my proudest moments were basically Monday mornings in my Cinematography class. Using the Screenwriting Curriculum, we would discuss character development and dialog. Many members of the class were fans of the Walking Dead TV show and each Monday we were able to talk about way more than just what happened in Sunday’s episode. We would discuss the choices they made and how they grew the character, theme, etc.”

Brian Wetzel, Zulama Teacher

“Over the years, I feared that I was too didactic and that students all programmed the same way as me based on my teaching and use of exemplars. However, this fear was unfounded . . . They’ve developed their own individual methods of solving problems through programming and this made me immensely proud. My second proudest achievement was finally breaking the gender gap. For September 2017, 54 percent of students choosing Computer Science as one of their three elective GCSE option subjects in Year 10 were female! This may not seem like a significant achievement, however the national average is 16.1 percent!”

William Lau, Assistant Headteacher, Author of Teaching Computing in Secondary Schools

Regarding Zulama courses I taught—The projects that were created in the Game Design class were amazing. Definitely my favorite moment.”

Blake Borden, Zulama Teacher

“My boy’s robotic team made it to state competition this year. I was so proud of their initiative, hard work, and creativity.”

Faith Plunkett, Entertainment Technology Academy Teacher

Celebrating Teachers

“Featuring the work of my daughter’s second-grade teacher and the teachers from my school in a conference presentation. I love sharing the amazing work that great teachers do every single day.”

Kerry Gallagher, Digital Learning Specialist at St. John’s Prep

“This past year, we had several teachers transform their classroom into imaginative worlds (e.g., Mario World), complete with hanging coin boxes that students could punch when they unlocked portions of the Breakout-style curriculum and physical activities that brought authentic application to their understanding of the content. We had teachers push past their uncertainties and utilize blogging and digital portfolios as vehicles for connected learning. And, we had teachers who became such believerssuch great sailboatsthat they shared their experiences with others as first-time presenters at major learning conferences.”

Brianna Henneke Hodges, Director of Digital Learning for Stephenville Independent School District

Want to spice up your curriculum this fall? Bring game design and computer science into any class, at any time with our 15–20—hour Short Courses.

Six Questions to Help You Find the Perfect PD

Teachers: Are you getting ready for your own summer of learning? Start by asking yourself a few questions that will help you figure out exactly what kind of program you need.

We know many of you are committed to your own learning, as well as your students’. For example, “three in five teachers are willing to spend their own time to learn more about computer science” (Google, 2017). Professional development (PD) should be a great experience–helping you meet your goals and engage your students–but that isn’t always the case. Starting with a little prep work can help you find that exceptional experience and leave you more prepared and excited about bringing new skills to your students.

Computer Science Teacher

Zulama is currently focused on supporting teachers who are looking for computer science PD, but the following essential questions can be applied to professional learning experiences of all kinds. These questions will help you figure out what PD will be the most fun and fruitful for you, and lead to the most engaging experiences for your students.

1. How much time do I have available to commit to PD?

Start with the basics. PD can range from three days of in-person workshops to 30 hours of self-paced online learning, so find the one that matches up best with your schedule. Teachers say that longer-term PD serves them better in their teaching practice (Gates Foundation, 2014), so consider options that let you pace yourself over time. For example, PD with an online component gives teachers the ability to continue returning to the course over the span of a semester or year. You’ll be less worried about running out of time, which means you’ll be able to tinker, play, and discover throughout your PD experience.

2. What is my end goal for participating in a PD opportunity?

Do your goals match up with the goals of the PD you are interested in? Is a given course preparing you to teach a specific course in the short-term or helping you build an adaptive set of skills? If you are looking to develop yourself as a professional in the long-run, make sure that the PD offering is aiming to involve you in an interactive project-based learning experience. The general consensus among teachers is the best PD programs “…involve hands-on strategies for the teacher to actually participate in” (Gates Foundation, 2014).

3. Which do I prefer, an independent or mentorship-based learning experience?

An online PD experience inevitably means more independence. This leads to perks including more flexibility and the ability to work at your own pace. In-person PD, on the other hand, allows for face-to-face connections, leading to a more disciplined use of your time. We often recommend combining online and in-person PD experiences as we find that the two together lead to the deepest learning.

4. Do I want to learn from fellow educators?

Find out who is driving the PD program you are considering. Have the PD leaders spent much time in the classroom? Was the program crafted by teachers like you who have experience bringing new skills and learning practices to students? Most teachers have had the best PD experiences when they know that the creators of the program have been in their shoes.

5. How much money is available to me for PD?

We ask this question next to last because it’s important to not let cost get in the way of finding the most effective, engaging PD for you. While price is a significant factor to consider, teachers and schools have found various creative ways to get outside funding for PD programs, and you can too.

6. Now… what’s out there?

Each PD program will have pros and cons, but there plenty of options are out there, so you can find one that suits your needs! For example, here is a chart that makes sense of some current computer science PD offerings:

Computer Science Professional Development

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This post was adapted from a Zulama article in the CSTA Voice about selecting teacher PD that is tailored to your needs.

This post is part of a blog series in support of our new professional development opportunity, the Computer Science and Game Design Certificate, co-developed with the Computer Science Teachers Association. For more on the intersection of computer science and professional development, read the previous posts in the series:

How Games Can Bring Storytelling to Life in Your Classroom

By: Chris Klug, Assistant Teaching Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and Anna Roberts, Head of Outreach at Zulama

As games continue to evolve and attract broader audiences, they have become sophisticated vehicles for storytelling—putting the player (i.e., audience) at the center of an experience and giving them the power to bring the narrative to life. Story-rich games like Journey, FireWatch, This War of Mine, or Dungeons & Dragons engage your emotions and immerse you in new worlds. Could these qualities of story-rich games help engage your students, introducing them to unique and exciting learning experiences?

“I’m not sure I would have been able to transition from reader to
writer so easily if it had not been for gaming.”
—Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author

Game stories draw from the same core principles that writers have used to craft stories for millennia. Most games have a plot, characters, a theme, and dialogue, making them exciting for students to explore as writers and “readers.” This post examines some of the similarities and differences between games and traditional storytelling, providing tools and inspiration for bringing games and game narratives into your creative writing or literature classes.

What’s the Same? What’s Different?

Point of View

All stories have a Point of View that determines whose eyes the reader experiences the story through. In games, that Point of View is always first person because the player is the protagonist—deciding where to go, interacting with the world, and making decisions that impact the game.

More on First Person and Third Person in Games
If you’ve played games before, you may have heard them referred to as first person (playing the game through the protagonist’s eyes) or third person (playing the game as the protagonist, viewing them from the outside). But those references are to your perspective through the graphics, not the character’s Point of View in the story.

First-Person Perspective in What Remains of Edith Finch by Giant Sparrow Gam

Third-Person Perspective in Journey by thatgamecompany

 

Structure

Most stories draw from a traditional three-act structure that the character moves through, and game narratives are no different.

Act 1: The Beginning
Here the story introduces the major characters and the Inciting Incident, the event or decision that begins the story’s problem and sets the story in motion. For example, in Gone Home the story begins with Katie, the protagonist, returning from a trip to Europe to find a locked, empty house. The Inciting Incident is an ominous letter left on the front door from someone named Sam.


Gone Home by The Fullbright Company

Act 2: The Middle
This is where the story develops, where the protagonist encounters a series of obstacles and setbacks that creates rising Tension. At times, the protagonist (aka player) may feel like they’re getting further from their goal, and even need to learn new skills or strategies in order to progress. An interesting challenge arises in writing Act 2 of game narratives. As the protagonist, the player experiences setbacks more directly than one might when reading a novel. The game’s writer must keep that experience in mind, providing challenges but ensuring that the player still feels like they are making progress.

Act 3: End
Here the protagonist encounters the Climax and wraps up any loose ends. The protagonist must use all that they’ve learned so far in the story to tackle the hardest challenge of them all. In games this is often referred to as “the Boss Fight,” but in story-rich games it might not be a fight at all. In What Remains of Edith Fitch one of the final scenes brings two stories together, merging fantasy and reality, and forcing the player to do different actions with each hand as they move between the storylines.

Emotion

Like traditional stories, story-rich games can make a player feel things in intense ways—the fear of entering a dark room, the joy of mastering an especially hard mission, the discomfort of an awkward situation, or the sadness of losing a beloved companion. Games are great at evoking some emotions and aren’t so great at others.

Games Aren’t Great at: Empathy
While empathy is often used in traditional stories to stir the reader’s emotions, that’s not so in games. The player is a direct agent who makes decisions and choices, so the emotions they feel are typically built through those experiences. The player is much more like an actor in a play rather than the audience watching the play.

Games Are Great at: Guilt
One emotion that is easy to evoke in games is guilt, which is almost impossible to elicit in traditional storytelling. Guilt occurs when a person believes (accurately or not) that they have compromised their own standards of conduct or a moral standard. As readers of traditional stories we’re passive, we can empathize or feel sad but we can’t compromise ourselves through the experience. Games charge the player with making decisions as the protagonist, letting them choose how they’ll play (moral vs immoral) or presenting them with hard choices that impact the game or other characters.

A recent example from Anna’s own gaming experience:
I’ve been playing Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, a game where one class of people (the augmented) is being oppressed by the larger population. In one part of the game, I (as the protagonist, Jensen) had to sneak into government offices to obtain documents that would help two people escape the city. When I arrived, I found out I could only save one of them and had to quickly choose between the two. I had met both of these characters, knew their stories and what they would face if they didn’t leave. The decision was a guilt-ridden one for me that lingered well after I had stopped playing.

Games Leave Room for the Player

One of the biggest functional differences in storytelling in games is that the game has to make room for the player–giving the player varying levels of freedom to interact, explore, and make choices within the game. This difference changes how the author needs to think about writing and even designing the story. From the moment of inspiration, game writing is a problem-solving exercise: creating a world and moving the player between major plot points, while also making room for the player to feel active and make decisions.

“In a game, you’re going to have to allow for player agency—the player needs to exert some control over the narrative’s direction . . . [this] changes how the story is laid out, and the tools a writer has at their disposal. ”
—Bill Gaider, Senior Writer at Bioware

An Analogy
Imagine that the writing process is like driving a car through the woods at night and the road is your story. If you’re writing fiction or poetry, it’s possible to just drive and discover the road as your headlights light the way. When writing a game, you need to know the end point and major intersections before you start driving. You’ll still discover details along the way that create a rich experience, but you have to understand the map first. (Of course, this approach can be used in traditional storytelling as well, it’s just mandatory when writing games.)

Bringing Games Into Your Classroom

Interesting, huh? And that’s just the start! Here are a few resources and ideas that could help you bring games into your classes:

Lucid Learning: Gone Home in a High School English Class

Paul Darvasi has done a bunch of cool things with games in his high school English classes. Paul’s blog details his experience using Gone Home as a literary text in three senior English classes. He provides “everything a teacher needs to know to duplicate the experience and, hopefully, build on it.”

Zulama Courses

Storytelling in Games
Zulama offers a 15-hour course called Storytelling in Games that is perfect for bringing game narratives into middle school English classes. In the course students create a game story through The Hero’s Journey.

Screenwriting
We also offer a full-semester Screenwriting course (co-developed with Chris) that helps high school students understand, critique, and write dramatic stories for movies, games, and television.

Computer Science and Game Design Certificate (professional learning)
If you want to learn more about games and game design yourself, the Computer Science and Game Design Certificate is a great option! Offered jointly by the Computer Science Teachers Association and Zulama, this 30-hour online course is a fun, rigorous introduction to both computer science and game design concepts.

Edutopia: Using Games for Serious Learning in High School

Social Studies teacher Matt Farber has written a book on game-inspired learning. In this Edutopia article he dives into a few more great story-rich games and how they could be used in schools to enhance students’ learning.

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This post is part of a blog series in support of our new professional development opportunity, the Computer Science and Game Design Certificate, co-developed with the Computer Science Teachers Association. For more on the intersection of computer science and professional development, read the previous posts in the series:

When There’s a Will There’s a Way: Getting Creative with Funding Computer Science Education

Four years ago, educators in Butler County, Ohio were facing a crisis. They wanted to implement modern curriculum and teacher training in schools across the county in order to re-engage students and prepare them for the rapidly changing job market. But, like in many other regions, Butler County’s resources were scarce. Before the educators could even think about making a change, they got stuck on one question: “Can we afford this?”

In their moment of doubt, they were able to turn the way they were thinking about funding inside out. They flipped the question from, “Can we afford this?” to, “Which organization can fund this?” It was not a matter of whether or not the funds were available, but a matter of who could provide the funds. This shift in thinking set them free!

The Butler County Educational Service Center put together a grant proposal for Ohio’s Straight A Fund. And . . . voila! A new curriculum aimed at impacting 3,028 students from grades 7 to 12, was implemented in Butler County’s classrooms. Students across the region were:


  • designing games for their programming course
  • writing stories for a screenwriting course
  • building digital portfolios to showcase their projects

 

 

You too can find creative ways to pay for curriculum or professional development. And once you recognize there is plenty of available funding out there, you can think less about the price tag and more about the number of students a program would impact or how fun a PD experience would be.

Whether you are a teacher or a school leader, tons of grant programs are available to you—and made specifically for you.

Resources for Finding Grant Programs

Grant Programs for School Leaders

Grant Programs for Teachers

Going Free-Form

You can get even more creative when it comes to finding funding. One way is looking to local companies for support. For example, you might send a funding proposal to a local technology company, and ask them to sponsor your school’s computer science PD. For decades, schools have fostered successful partnerships with local businesses:

“Since 1990, the Lees Summit (Mo.) School District has worked with 250 local business partners, including corporations that send experts to the high school’s marketing classes and local banks that deploy volunteers to help teach math in elementary classrooms. For even longer, the Anchorage (Alaska) Public Schools has cultivated relationships with 500 local businesses and organizations, which do everything from providing mentors to funding school projects.” (District Administration, 2012 via EdSurge, 2016.)

If you are writing a grant proposal or business partner proposal from scratch, here are some foundational questions to start with (adapted from the CS4HS Google Grant Questions):

  • What kinds of organizations, local offices of education, etc. are you working with or planning to work with in developing and implementing this opportunity?
  • What are up to five learning objectives your opportunity will achieve?
  • What is the learning format and agenda?
  • How is the content relevant to computer science?
  • How will you make sure concepts are taught effectively in the classroom? (You may want to include a quotation from a teacher who has taken the PD course or used the curriculum before.)
  • How will you measure success?
  • Who is your target audience?
  • What are your expenses?
  • How much funding are you requesting?

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This post is part of a blog series in support of our new professional development opportunity, the Computer Science and Game Design Certificate, co-developed with the Computer Science Teachers Association. For more on the intersection of computer science and professional development, read the previous posts in the series: